National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE)

The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) annually assesses the extent to which undergraduate students are involved in educational practices empirically linked to high levels of learning and development. Schools from all across the country participate in NSSE. This year's analysis is based on approximately 162,000 randomly selected students at 472 four-year colleges and universities that participated in the NSSE in 2004. The students represent a broad cross-section of first-year and senior students from every region of the country. The institutions are similar in most respects to the universe of four-year schools.

 

What are NSSE Benchmarks?

In an effort to make it easier for people on and off campus to talk productively about student engagement and its importance to student learning, collegiate quality, and institutional improvement, NSSE created five clusters or benchmarks of effective educational practice.

The benchmarks are made up of groups of items on the survey and are expressed in 100-point scales. Each year, NSSE calculates benchmark scores to monitor performance at the institutional, sector, and national level.

The benchmark report presents Earlham's benchmark scores and compares them to schools in our Carnegie Classification, along with the NSSE national norms.

Click on the following to be linked to a specific benchmark report:

Level of Academic Challenge

Active and Collaborative Learning

Student-Faculty Interactions

Enriching Educational Experiences

Supportive Campus Environment

 

Level of Academic Challenge

Challenging intellectual and creative work is central to student learning and collegiate quality. Colleges and universities promote high levels of student achievement by emphasizing the importance of academic effort and setting high expectations for student performance.

The following graph shows how Earlham College compares both with our Carnegie Classification (Bac-LA) and the NSSE national norms for the benchmark level of academic challenge.

 

Click here to see academic challenge survey items.

 

Active and Collaborative Learning

Students learn more when they are intensely involved in their education and asked to think about what they are learning in different settings. Collaborating with others in solving problems or mastering difficult material prepares students for the messy, unscripted problems they will encounter daily during and after college.

The following graph shows how Earlham College compares both with our Carnegie Classification (Bac-LA) and the NSSE national norms for the benchmark active and collaborative learning.

 

Click here to see active and collaborative learning survey items.

 

Student-Faculty Interaction

Students learn firsthand how experts think about and solve practical problems by interacting with faculty members inside and outside the classroom. As a result, their teachers become role models, mentors, and guides for continuous, life-long learning.

The following graph shows how Earlham College compares both with our Carnegie Classification (Bac-LA) and the NSSE national norms for the benchmark student-faculty interaction.

 

Click here to see student-faculty interaction survey items.

 

Enriching Educational Experiences

Complementary learning opportunities in and out of class augment academic programs. Diversity experiences teach students valuable things about themselves and others. Technology facilitates collaboration between peers and instructors. Internships, community service, and senior capstone courses provide opportunities to integrate and apply knowledge.

The following graph shows how Earlham College compares both with our Carnegie Classification (Bac-LA) and the NSSE national norms for the benchmark enriching educational experiences.

 

Click here to see enriching educational experiences survey items.

 

Supportive Campus Environment

Students perform better and are more satisfied at colleges that are committed to their success and cultivate positive working and social relations among different groups on campus.

The following graph shows how Earlham College compares both with our Carnegie Classification (Bac-LA) and the NSSE national norms for the benchmark supportive campus environment.

 

Click here to see supportive campus environment survey items.

 

 

Created by Nichole Dudley and Mary Ann Weaver
weavema@earlham.edu
November 16, 2004

Revised December 16, 2004