Faculty Survey 1998-99

Index to Tables:

Table 1 - Academic Rank
Table 2 - Field of Highest Degree
Table 3 - Year Highest Degree Earned
Table 4 - Ages of Children
Table 5 - General Activities
Table 6 - General Activities in the last two years
Table 7 - Teaching Activities in the last two years
Table 8 - Hours per Week Spent on Scheduled Teaching
Table 9 - Hours per Week Spent on Preparing for Teaching
Table 10 - Hours per Week Spent on Advising/Counseling of Students
Table 11 - Hours per Week Spent on Committee Work and Meetings
Table 12 - Hours per Week Spent on Other Administration
Table 13 - Hours per Week Spent on Research and Scholarly Writing
Table 14 - Goals Noted as Very Important or Essential
Table 15
- Evaluation Methods Used in Most or All Undergraduate Classes
Table 16 - Instructional Methods Used in Most or All Undergraduate Classes
Table 17 - Goals for Undergraduates Noted as Very Important or Essential
Table 18 - Political Orientation
Table 19
- Attitudes on Issues of Government and Lifestyles
Table 20 - Issues Noted as Being of High or Highest Priority
Table 21 - Attributes Noted as Being Very Descriptive of Institution
Table 22 - Personal Goals Noted as Very Important or Essential
Table 23 - Aspects of One's Job Noted as Satisfactory or Very Satisfactory
Table 24 - Sources of Stress

In order to learn about the kinds of people who choose to teach at Earlham, a survey conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute at the University of California was given to the teaching and administrative faculty in April of 1999.  The results of this survey follow and the information from it may be useful in showing the attitudes and values of the typical Earlham faculty member.

The faculty were first questioned about their age.  Of the 66 faculty who responded to the survey at Earlham, 19.5% were under the age of 30 as of December 31, 1998.  There was an equal percentage of faculty (15.2%) who were between the ages of 35 and 39 and between the ages of 45 and 49.   7.6% were in the 40-44 age group.  22.7% were ages 50-59, while only  9% were over the age of 60.  3% were over the age of 70.  In terms of all colleges and universities in the U.S., the largest age group for professors is 45-54 with 35%.   5 % are over the age of 60.

Earlham faculty were also asked about their academic rank.  Table 1 below gives a summary of the results of this question.

Table 1

Academic Rank

 

Earlham Teaching Faculty

All Priv. 4-year Colleges

All Inst.

 

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Total

 
%
%
%
%
%
%
%

Professor

66.7

20.0

45.5

38.6

18.2

30.9

33.4

Associate Professor

11.1

13.3

12.1

29.6

29.4

29.5

25.3

Assistant Professor

5.6

46.7

24.2

23.8

38.1

29.2

22.2

Lecturer

5.6

0.0

3.0

.8

2.3

1.4

2.8

Instructor

11.1

13.3

12.1

5.5

10.1

7.2

14.7

Other

0.0

6.7

3.0

1.7

1.8

1.7

1.6

Although the percentage of males who are full professors is greater than that of females, Earlham still has a higher percentage of female professors when compared to the average private college.  Also, the overall percentage of full professors at EC is greater than that percentage for all colleges and universities.

In terms of degrees earned by Earlham faculty, of those surveyed 87.5% held at least a Master’s degree or other first professional degree.  71.9% of the teaching faculty members hold a Ph.D. in some field.  At comparable colleges (private four-year institutions), only 65.9% have Ph.D.’s.  

As well as being asked about the highest degree they had earned, Earlham professors were asked in which field they had received that degree.

 

Table 2

Field of Highest Degree

 

Earlham

All Priv. 4-year Colleges

All Inst.

 

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Total

 
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
Agriculture or Forestry
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.4

Biological Sciences

5.6

7.1

6.3

7.6

6.1

7.0

5.0

Business

0.0

0.0

0.0

6.1

3.7

5.2

4.0

Education

5.6

0.0

3.1

10.5

18.5

13.5

20.7

Engineering

0.0

0.0

0.0

2.2

0.3

1.4

1.0

English

11.1

7.1

9.4

6.8

10.6

8.2

10.0

Health-related

5.6

0.0

3.1

1.0

9.2

4.1

11.2

History or Political Science

16.7

14.3

15.6

9.0

5.5

7.7

5.1

Humanities

22.2

14.3

18.7

15.3

11.9

14.0

9.0

Fine Arts

5.6

21.4

12.5

9.5

8.8

9.2

8.2

Mathematics or Statistics

5.6

7.1

6.3

5.3

3.3

4.6

4.0

Physical Sciences

11.1

0.0

6.3

10.2

4.0

7.9

3.0

Social Sciences

11.1

21.4

15.6

11.6

13.4

12.3

12.0

Other Technical

0.0

0.0

0.0

1.7

1.0

1.4

1.1

Other Non-Technical

0.0

7.1

3.1

3.1

3.4

3.2

5.3

Not surprisingly, large numbers of Earlham professors earned their highest degree in such fields as Humanities (18.7 %), History or Political Science ( 15.6%), and Social Sciences (15.6%).


Table 3

Year Highest Degree Earned

 

Earlham

All Priv. 4-year Colleges

All Inst.

 

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Total

 
%
%
%
%
%
%
%

Before 1961

5.6

0.0

3.0

2.9

1.6

2.4

3.3

1961 to 1965

0.0

0.0

0.0

4.7

1.6

3.5

4.8

1966 to 1970

16.7

0.0

9.1

9.7

2.9

7.1

10.7

1971 to 1975

16.7

20.0

18.2

14.4

6.8

11.5

13.6

1976 to 1980

22.2

6.7

15.2

13.2

11.3

12.4

12.7

1981 to 1985

22.2

0.0

12.1

14.0

16.1

14.8

13.1

1986 to 1990

11.1

20.0

15.2

14.4

19.8

16.4

15.5

1991 to 1995

0.0

40.0

18.2

17.8

25.9

20.9

17.6

1996 to 1998

5.6

13.3

9.1

9.1

14.0

10.9

8.6

It is not surprising that there are no female Earlham teaching faculty members who received their highest degree before 1970.  40% of the female teaching faculty earned their highest degree between 1991 and 1995 compared to 25.9% of female faculty who teach at private four-year colleges.

One question dealt with the issue of tenure.  When asked if they were tenured, 59.4 % of the Earlham teaching faculty said that they were.  This can be compared to 49.2% of faculty at all private four-year colleges.  Breaking this group down into male and female, we see that at Earlham  76.5% of male faculty and  40% of female faculty has tenure.  Among all four-year private colleges, 55.6% of male faculty and 38.9 of female faculty were tenured.

In addition to being asked questions about their education and their position as professors, Earlham faculty were asked about their attitudes towards teaching.  When asked about their primary interest in being a college professor, the majority (84.4%) of teaching faculty respondents said that they were either very heavily interested in teaching or that their interest leaned toward teaching.  84.2% of teaching faculty at other private institutions similar to Earlham expressed the same interests as teaching faculty here.  While 15.6% of Earlham teaching faculty leans more toward research, 14.6% of teaching faculty at private, four-year colleges and 23.8% of teaching faculty in all institutions have this interest.  No Earlham faculty member considered him/herself heavily interested in research, though 1.2% of private college professors and 3.3% of all professors see this as their primary interest.

Questions on the faculty survey did not deal solely with the college-related aspects of the professors’ lives but also with personal and familial questions.  Faculty members were asked about their marital status as well as the education of partners and parents.

A question about marital status revealed that 77.8% of male professors and 80% of female professors at Earlham are married.  This differs from the marital statuses of all faculty at private, four-year institutions, where the trend of more married male than female professors continues as 83.4% of the males and 65.1% of the females are married.  9.1% of Earlham teaching faculty are unmarried and living with a partner compared to 3.3% of faculty at private four-year colleges and 4.4% from all institutions.  18.2% of Earlham faculty have been divorced compared to 19% from private four-year colleges and 25.2 from all institutions.

Those faculty members who are (or were) married or currently have a partner were asked about the level of education that their spouse or partner obtained.   Many spouses of Earlham professors obtained advanced degrees, with 57.6% reporting this level of education.  45.1% of the spouses of private, four-year college faculty had received the same level of education and 44.9% of spouses of all college and university professors earned an advanced degree.

In terms of parental education, Earlham faculty tended to come from fairly educated families, with 60.7% of their fathers and 39.4% of their mothers having obtained at least a college degree.  The percentages of professors at private, four-year colleges whose parents earned similar degrees are 42.1% and 32.1% respectively.  While 27.3% of Earlham faculty fathers and 6.1% of their mothers earned advanced degrees,  19.1% of  fathers of all college professors and 9.4% of their mothers received comparable degrees.

Another question relating to being an Earlham professor asked about the salaries that these faculty members make.  When asked, a large number of faculty (25.9%) reported earnings between $40,000 and $49,000 annually.  11.1% reported making less than $20,000 and 25.9% reported making over $60,000.  In all institutions surveyed, 24.8% of professors make between $40,000 and $49,000; 3.2% make less than $20,000, and a large number (30.7%) make over $60,000.

Teaching faculty were asked about the ages of their children.   As Table 4 indicates, children of Earlham teaching faculty have a similar age range to most teaching faculty nationally.  The greatest distinction is in the 24 and over age bracket where 34% of teaching faculty nationally have children in this age bracket but only 24.3% of Earlham teaching faculty have children aged 24 or over.

Table 4
Ages of Children
 

Earlham

All institutions

Children 0-4 years

9.1%

11%

Children 5 to 12

27.2%

20.4%

Children 13 to 17

24.2%

17.7%

Children 18 to 23

18.2%

20.5%

Children 24 or over

24.3%

34%


Earlham professors were asked questions about their activities, both in general and in relation to teaching.  The results of these questions are noted in Table 5.

Table 5
General Activities

 

Earlham

All Private 4-yr Colleges

All Institutions

Held academic administrative position

54.5%

41.1%

35.7%

Received award for outstanding teaching

24.2%

37.0%

39.5%

Spouse or partner an academic

41.9%

32.8%

31.6%

Commute a long distance to work

12.1%

18.4%

19.4%

Research/writing on women/gender

56.2%

26.5%

23.6%

Research/writing on race/ethnicity

34.4%

22.8%

21.9%

Am a U.S. citizen

100%

95.4%

95.1%

Interrupted career for health/family

12.1%

13.8%

14.4%

Plan working beyond age 70

27.3%

33.7%

32.7%

Though Earlham professors are very similar to all college faculty in most respects, they differ considerably from the norm in the area of gender issues.  While 56.2% of Earlham faculty have done research or writing on women or gender issues, only 23.6% of all college professors have done so.  Also a higher percentage of Earlham professors hold administrative positions than the national norm.

Table 6
General Activities in the Last Two Years

 

Earlham

All Private 4-year Colleges

All Institutions

Had one or more firm job offers

33.3%

28.7%

28.1%

Developed a new course

78.8%

76.5%

71.6%

Considered early retirement

31.2%

26.7%

31.2%

Considered leaving academe

42.4%

35.0%

34.9%

Served as a paid consultant

45.5%

32.2%

38.3%

In the last two years, a greater percentage of  (45.4%) of Earlham faculty have served as a paid consultant, as compared to 38.3% of all college faculty.


Table 7
Teaching Activities in the Last Two Years
 

Earlham

All Private 4-year Colleges

All Institutions

Taught honors course

19.4%

20.0%

20.4%

Taught interdisciplinary course

71.9%

45.3%

38.3%

Taught ethnic studies course

18.7%

11.8%

9.4%

Taught women’s studies course

12.9%

10.3%

7.5%

Team-taught a course

40.6%

40.0%

38.1%

Worked with students on a research project

84.8%

67.8%

68.7%

Attended a teaching enhancement workshop

41.9%

64.5%

59.0%

Put or collected assignments on the Internet

41.9%

34.5%

35.9%

Taught course exclusively on the Internet

0%

1.6%

2.3%

Used funds for research

59.4%

41.6%

45.2%

Although their general activities might be similar to those of professors everywhere, the teaching experiences of Earlham professors are quite different from those of their counterparts elsewhere.  While only 38.3% of all college professors have taught interdisciplinary courses, 71.9% of Earlham faculty have done so.  Similarly, 18.7% of Earlham professors have taught ethnic studies while the national percentage is 9.4%.  The emphasis on Women’s Studies is again evident as 12.9% of Earlham faculty have taught one of these courses while only 7.5% of all college and university professors have done the same.  Earlham professors are also more likely to work with students on a research project, as 84.8% have done so.

Another set of questions asked the Earlham faculty how much time they spent per week  in the following activities.

Table 8
Hours per Week Spent on Scheduled Teaching
 

Earlham

All Priv. 4-year Colleges

All Inst.

 

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Total

None

0

0

0

.3%

.3%

.3%

.5%

1-4

5.6%

6.7%

6.1%

3.4%

5.3%

4.1%

8.8%

5-8

44.4%

53.3%

48.5%

20.3%

22.6%

21.1%

35.0%

9-12

33.3%

26.7%

30.3%

47.3%

42.4%

45.5%

37.1%

13-16

11.1%

13.3%

12.1%

20.1%

19.6%

19.9%

12.1%

17-20

5.6%

0

3.0%

5.9%

6.6%

6.2%

4.3%

21-34

0

0

0

2.5%

2.9%

2.6%

1.8%

35-44

0

0

0

.1%

.2%

.1%

.2%

45 or more

0

0

0

.1%

.2%

.1%

.1%

The majority (81.4%) of Earlham professors spend between 5 and 12 hours teaching each week,  while 12.1% of Earlham professors spend 13-16 hours per week.  At private colleges, a greater percentage (19.9%) spend between 13 and 16 hours on scheduled teaching.

Table 9
Hours per Week Spent on Preparing for Teaching
 

Earlham

All Priv. 4-year Colleges

All Inst.

 

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Total

None

0

0

0

.1%

.3%

.3%

.5%

1-4

0

7.1%

3.1%

7.1%

5.3%

4.1%

7.6%

5-8

11.1%

28.6%

18.7%

19.3%

22.6%

21.1%

30.3%

9-12

33.3%

28.6%

31.2%

24.3%

42.4%

45.5%

32.8%

13-16

22.2%

21.4%

21.9%

18.6%

19.6%

19.9%

16.2%

17-20

22.2%

7.1%

15.6%

15.9%

6.6%

6.2%

7.6%

21-34

11.1%

7.1%

9.4%

11.7%

2.9%

2.6%

4.6%

35-44

0

0

0

2.3%

.2%

.1%

.2%

45 or more

0

0

0

.8%

.2%

.1%

.1%

Earlham professors seem to spend more time preparing for teaching than they do actually instructing a class since 15.1% spend over 13 hours in scheduled teaching and 46.9% spend over 13 hours preparing for teaching.

 
Table 10
Hours per Week Spent on Advising/Counseling of Students
 

Earlham

All Priv. 4-year Colleges

All Inst.

 

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Total

None

0

6.7%

3.0%

2.4%

1.9%

2.2%

3.7%

1-4

72.2%

53.3%

63.6%

59.5%

53.2%

57.1%

59.7%

5-8

22.2%

40.0%

30.3%

28.9%

31.9%

30.1%

27.5%

9-12

5.6%

0

3.0%

6.8%

9.4%

7.8%

6.6%

13-16

0

0

0

1.9%

2.3%

2.0%

1.6%

17-20

0

0

0

.4%

.9%

.6%

.6%

21-34

0

0

0

.1%

.2%

.2%

.3%

35-44

0

0

0

0

.2%

.1%

0

45 or more

0

0

0

0

.1%

.1%

0

As one can see from Table 10, most Earlham professors spend 1-4 hours a week counseling students.  This is true of most college professors.  However, 3% of all private four-year college professors spend over 13 hours per week in this capacity.

 Table 11
Hours per Week Spent on Committee Work and Meetings
 

Earlham

All Priv. 4-year Colleges

All Inst.

 

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Total

None

16.7%

6.7%

12.1%

5.5%

3.8%

4.8%

6.8%

1-4

44.4%

53.3%

48.5%

72.7%

66.9%

70.5%

66.1%

5-8

33.3%

40.0%

36.4%

17.8%

23.6%

20.0%

21.0%

9-12

0

0

0

3.2%

4.5%

3.7%

4.5%

13-16

5.6%

0

3%

.6%

.8%

.7%

1.0%

17-20

0

0

0

.1%

.3%

.2%

.4%

21-34

0

0

0

0

.1%

.1%

.1%

35-44

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

45 or more

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Approximately 88% of Earlham professors spend at least one hour a week on committee work and meetings, compared to 95.2% of professors at private colleges and 93.1% of all professors.  Only 5.6% of male professors at Earlham devote over 13 hours of time each week on committee work and meetings and there were no female respondents who indicated they spend more than 8 hours per week in such activities.

Table 12
Hours per Week Spent on Other Administration
 

Earlham

All Priv. 4-year Colleges

All Inst.

 

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Total

None

17.6%

13.3%

15.6%

32.4%

30.2%

31.6%

36.8%

1-4

29.4%

53.3%

40.6%

40.0%

41.3%

40.5%

40.3%

5-8

23.5%

13.3%

18.7%

14.9%

15.1%

15.0%

11.4%

9-12

17.6%

6.7%

12.5%

5.6%

6.4%

5.9%

5.1%

13-16

0

6.7%

3.1%

2.5%

3.1%

2.7%

2.6%

17-20

5.9%

6.7%

6.3%

2.6%

2.0%

2.3%

2.1%

21-34

5.9%

0

3.1%

1.6%

1.5%

1.6%

1.2%

35-44

0

0

0

.2%

.2%

.2%

.2%

45 or more

0

0

0

.2%

.2%

.2%

.2%

Table 12 shows that Earlham professors are less likely than professors at other private colleges to spend no time in administrative work.  Also, there is a greater percentage of Earlham faculty who spend over 13 hours a week in administrative work ( 12.5%) than professors at other private colleges (7%).

Table 13
Hours per Week Spent on Research and Scholarly Writing
 

Earlham

All Priv. 4-year Colleges

All Inst.

 

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Total

None

11.8%

53.3%

31.2%

25.1%

31.3%

27.5%

25.3%

1-4

52.9%

33.3%

43.7%

40.2%

41.6%

40.7%

30.2%

5-8

11.8%

6.7%

9.4%

19.1%

16.5%

18.1%

17.3%

9-12

5.9%

6.7%

6.3%

8.7%

6.5%

7.9%

11.0%

13-16

17.6%

0

9.4%

3.3%

2.1%

2.9%

6.2%

17-20

0

0

0

1.8%

1.2%

1.6%

5.3%

21-34

0

0

0

1.3%

.6%

1.1%

3.3%

35-44

0

0

0

.2%

.1%

.1%

1.0%

45 or more

0

0

0

.2%

.2%

.2%

.5%

No Earlham professors spend more than 16 hours a week on research or scholarly writing compared to 10.1% of professors nation-wide.   31.2% of Earlham faculty spend no time on research or writing, with females being more likely to spend no time on research or writing.

When asked about their professional writings, 84.4% of Earlham faculty had written at least one article for an academic or professional journal.  34.4% of Earlham professors had published at least five articles, and 3.1% had produced more than 50 articles.  In terms of chapters in edited volumes, 59.4% had written at least one.  32.3% of Earlham faculty published at least one book, manual, or monograph.  More recently, 57.6% have published at least one writing in the last two years.

Table 14
Goals Noted as Very Important or Essential
 

Earlham professors

All private colleges

 

1998

1995

1989

1998

Become authority in own field

42.4%

N/A

N/A

46.0%

Influence social values

51.5%

N/A

N/A

44.4%

Raise a family

72.7%

N/A

N/A

72.9%

Help others in difficulty

69.7%

N/A

N/A

72.0%

Develop philosophy of life

78.8%

N/A

N/A

83.2%

Promote racial understanding

84.8%

N/A

N/A

64.7%

Be involved in environmental clean-up

39.4%

N/A

N/A

29.3%

Be a good colleague

97.0%

93.6%

93.0%

92.4%

Be a good teacher

100%

100%

100%

99.0%

The most common goals noted as very important or essential are to be a good teacher and colleague.  Promoting racial understanding is more important to Earlham professors than to all college professors.  Earlham professors are also more interested in environmental clean up.

Table 15
Evaluation Methods Used in Most or all Undergraduate Classes
 

Earlham professors

All private colleges

 

1998

1995

1989

1998

Multiple-choice mid-terms/finals

3.0%

4.3%

4.7%

26.8%

Essay mid-terms/finals

57.6%

51.1%

72.7%

47.5%

Short-answer mid-terms/finals

39.4%

29.8%

38.6%

36.2%

Quizzes

27.3%

23.9%

51.0%

35.4%

Weekly essay assignments

30.3%

10.6%

15.9%

18.7%

Student presentations

66.7%

53.2%

41.9%

40.3%

Term/research papers

51.5%

48.9%

56.8%

40.5%

Student evaluations of each others’ work

12.1%

14.9%

4.5%

14.5%

Grading on a curve

9.1%

10.6%

15.9%

14.9%

Competency-based grading

40.6%

34.8%

41.9%

45.2%

Earlham professors are much less likely to use multiple-choice exams for midterms and finals than all college professors.  There has been a decrease in the percentage of Earlham professors that use essays for midterms and finals since 1989, though the current percentage is still greater than the percentage for all college professors.  Earlham professors are also less likely to use quizzes than they did in 1989, but they are now more likely to use weekly essay assignments.

Table 16
Instructional Methods Used in Most or all Undergraduate Classes
 

Earlham professors

All private colleges

 

1998

1995

1989

1998

 
%
%
%
%

Class discussions

78.8

78.7

72.7

73.3

Computer/machine-aided instruction

9.1

21.3

6.8

19.8

Cooperative learning

63.6

71.7

52.3

42.9

Experiential learning/field studies

27.3

19.1

9.1

21.6

Teaching assistants

9.1

14.9

9.1

5.9

Recitals/Demonstrations

21.9

19.1

N/A

16.9

Group projects

33.3

31.9

13.6

26.1

Independent projects

45.5

53.2

44.2

36.5

Extensive lecturing

36.4

29.8

44.2

39.8

Multiple drafts of written work

18.2

27.7

16.3

18.7

Readings on racial and ethnic issues

39.4

27.7

30.2

19.6

Readings on women and gender issues

51.5

36.2

44.2

19.2

Student-developed activities (assignments, exams, etc.)

12.5

17.0

11.6

11.9

Student-selected topics for course content

9.1

8.5

14.0

7.9

Class discussions are the most frequently used instructional method among all survey populations.  Earlham professors use readings on women, gender, racial and ethnic issues far more than the national sample and have increased the use of those methods since 1995.  It is interesting to note that there was a smaller percentage of Earlham faculty who used computer-aided instruction in 1998 than in 1995 and a smaller percentage than the national sample.

 
Table 17
Goals for Undergraduates Noted as Very Important or Essential
 

Earlham professors

All private colleges

 

1998

1995

1989

1998

 
%
%
%
%

Develop ability to think clearly

100.0

97.8

97.7

99.5

Prepare for employment

56.2

40.4

41.9

67.2

Prepare for graduate education

71.9

46.8

67.4

58.3

Develop moral character

75.0

76.6

86.0

55.5

Provide for emotional development

68.8

59.6

55.8

35.3

Prepare students for family living

31.2

17.0

11.9

15.0

Teach students the classic works of Western civilization

37.5

26.1

45.2

30.2

Help students develop personal values

84.4

N/A

N/A

57.7

Enhance the out-of-class experience of students

59.4

58.7

48.8

39.3

Enhance students self-understanding

87.5

72.3

79.1

60.2

Instill in students a commitment to community service

50.0

39.1

N/A

35.1

Prepare students for responsible citizenship

77.4

68.1

N/A

59.0

Enhance students’ knowledge of and appreciation for other racial/ethnic groups

84.3

N/A

N/A

56.6

The national sample of private colleges is more concerned than the Earlham respondents with preparing students for employment.  A much larger percentage of Earlham respondents (71.9%) felt it was very important to prepare students for graduate schools than was reported in 1995 (46.8%).  Earlham focuses more on personal growth, including emotional development, moral character, self-understanding and responsible citizenship.  It is interesting to note that more Earlham faculty reported feeling it was very important or essential to prepare students for family living than in previous years.  Earlham faculty members also are more interested in enhancing the out-of-class experience of students than the national sample of private colleges.

Earlham faculty were asked how many general education courses they were teaching during the current semester.  The majority (58.1%) were teaching one such course, while 6.5% were teaching two and 3.2% were teaching three.  No respondents were teaching more than three courses and 32.3% were teaching no general education courses. 

Nationally, 49% were not teaching any general education courses, 22% were teaching one, 14% were teaching two, and 14.9% were teaching three or more general education courses.


Table 18
Political Orientation
 

98 EC
teaching faculty

95 EC
teaching faculty

98 EC
administrative

All private colleges

 
%
%
%
%

Far left

12.9

14.9

7.4

5.2

Liberal

48.4

59.6

25.9

37.5

Middle-of-road

32.3

23.4

48.1

33.6

Conservative

6.5

2.1

18.5

23.1

Far right

0

0

0

.5

The Earlham samples are generally farther left-leaning than the sample from all private colleges.  Within Earlham, the teaching faculty identify themselves more often as “far left” than the administrative faculty, and there is a higher percentage of administrative faculty that consider themselves  conservative (18.5%) than the teaching faculty (6.5%).  The number of teaching faculty that consider themselves liberal or far-left has decreased since 1995.

Table 19
Attitudes on Issues of Government and Lifestyles *
 

98 EC

teachers

95 EC

teachers

98 EC

admin

All private colleges

 
%
%
%
%

West Civ foundation of curriculum

54.8

33.3

40.0

62.6

College-ban extreme speakers

34.4

15.6

15.4

37.0

College increase earning power

15.6

6.5

11.5

19.2

Diversity = under-prepared students

15.6

23.4

7.7

24.9

Colleges involved in social problems

90.6

87.2

92.3

67.0

Tenure is outmoded

28.1

40.4

43.5

35.0

Encourage student community service

100.0

97.8

100.0

89.0

Community service given weight in admis

84.4

71.7

84.0

59.5

Tenure attracts best

51.6

45.7

56.5

56.7

Stud use of computers enhances learning

87.9

N/A

88.5

87.5

Diverse students body enhances educ

100.0

N/A

100.0

93.3

SPECIFIC TO EARLHAM

Faculty interest in students problems

100.0

95.7

92.3

90.1

People don’t respect each other

9.1

14.9

19.2

26.3

Students well prepared academically

72.7

63.8

80.0

40.3

Student Affairs has support of faculty

60.6

55.3

44.0

70.1

Faculty committed to welfare of Earlham

100.0

100.0

96.2

92.1

Fac. Interested in student’s acad problems

93.9

100.0

100.0

92.4

There is a lot of campus racial conflict

12.5

10.6

3.8

8.3

Courses include feminist perspective

93.8

80.9

84.0

38.1

Faculty of color are treated fairly

93.9

93.6

88.0

88.5

Women faculty are treated fairly

100.0

97.9

92.0

86.2

Courses involve stud in community svc

78.1

57.4

80.0

46.8

Student committed to community service

97.0

80.9

88.0

48.8

Gay and lesbian faculty treated fairly

68.8

N/A

76.0

62.9

My research valued by faculty in my dept

80.6

N/A

71.4

76.8

*Percentages are those answering that they “agree strongly” or “agree somewhat” with the statement given.

There are several tremendous differences among samples for these respondents, particularly between Earlham faculty and the national sample.  The 1998 Earlham faculty respondents agree much more strongly that the national faculty sample that community service should be given weight in admission decisions and that colleges should be involved in social problems.  Concerning issues related to the participant’s institution, Earlham faculty respondents agree much more strongly that courses at Earlham involve students in community service, include the feminist perspective, and that our students are well prepared academically.  On the other hand, Earlham faculty (especially administrative faculty) felt less strongly that Earlham’s Student Affairs had the support of our faculty. 

Earlham faculty feel more strongly than all private college faculty that people respect each other at our institution.  In 1998, there was a  greater percentage of Earlham professors (54.8%) who feel Western Civilization should be the foundation of undergraduate curriculum than in 1995 when only 33.3% of our teaching faculty felt the same.  Surprisingly, there was also a greater percentage of teaching faculty (34.4%) who felt that college officials have the right to ban persons with extreme views from speaking on campus which was in line with the national response for all private colleges (37%). Only 15.4% of administrative faculty agreed strongly with this viewpoint.

It was also surprising to find that 12.5% of our teaching faculty believe that there is a lot of campus racial conflict compared to 8.3% of all private college faculty.  This compares to 10.6% of teaching faculty in 1995 feeling the same.

 

Table 20
Issues Noted as Being of High or Highest Priority
 

98 EC teachers

95 EC
teachers

98 EC
admin

All private colleges

 
%
%
%
%

Promote intellectual development of students

100.0

100.0

100.0

87.8

Help students examine and understand their personal values

97.0

91.5

92.3

77.5

Hire more minority faculty and administrators

81.8

59.6

84.6

37.8

Develop a sense of community among students and faculty

97.0

83.0

96.2

64.9

Develop leadership ability among students

69.7

61.7

80.8

62.1

Hire more women faculty and administrators

69.7

51.1

69.2

35.2

Facilitate student involvement in community service

93.8

76.1

96.2

59.5

Help students learn how to bring about change in American society

90.9

78.7

80.8

39.5

Increase or maintain institutional prestige

57.6

69.6

69.2

70.0

Hire faculty “stars”

0

6.4

19.2

14.4

Recruit more minority students

90.9

63.8

92.3

48.7

Enhance the institution’s national image

60.6

74.5

69.2

66.1

Create a diverse multi-cultural campus environment

84.8

66.0

88.5

49.5

The Earlham respondents are more committed to hiring more minority and women, recruiting more minority students, and creating a diverse multi-cultural campus environment.  They are also more committed to helping students examine and understand their personal values, developing a sense of community among students and faculty, and facilitating student involvement in community service.  Faculty at Earlham give higher priority to developing student’s leadership abilities and helping students learn how to bring about change in American society than the national norm. 

 

Table 21
Attributes Noted as Being Very Descriptive of Institution
 

98 EC teachers

95 EC
teachers

98 EC
admin

All private colleges

 
%
%
%
%

Easy to see faculty outside of office hours

84.8

83.0

79.2

66.4

Great conformity among students

9.1

12.8

4.0

33.7

Faculty at odds with administration

0

23.4

7.7

15.2

Faculty respect each other

84.8

70.2

46.2

46.3

Most students treated like numbers

0

0

0

1.0

Social activities overemphasized

0

0

3.8

10.9

Intercoll. sports overemphasized

3.0

2.2

0

10.9

Students don’t socialize regularly

0

0

0

1.2

Faculty rewarded for good teaching

34.4

52.2

32.0

19.2

Earlham faculty perceive that it is much easier to see Earlham faculty outside of their office hours than it is for the national sample.  A large percentage (84.8%) of the teaching faculty feel that Earlham faculty have a great respect for each other, however only 46.2% of administrative faculty indicated that was very descriptive of Earlham.  The most significant difference in the 1998 responses compared to the 1995 responses concerned the faculty being at odds with administration.  In 1995, 23.4% of the teaching faculty felt that they were at odds with the administration compared to no teaching faculty feeling that way in 1998.  Another difference related to faculty being rewarded for good teaching.  In 1995, 52.2% of Earlham professors felt they were rewarded for good teaching compared to 34.4% in 1998.  However, only 19.2 of the national sample for all faculty at private colleges felt they were rewarded for good teaching.


Table 22
Personal Goals Noted as Very Important or Essential
 

98 EC teachers

95 EC
teachers

98 EC
admin

All private colleges

 
%
%
%
%

Becoming an authority in my field

42.4

42.6

40.7

46.0

Influencing the political structure

18.2

23.4

11.5

13.8

Influencing social values

51.5

57.4

53.8

44.4

Raising a family

72.7

72.3

81.5

72.9

Being very well-off financially

33.3

19.1

22.2

27.3

Helping others who are in difficulty

69.7

59.6

59.3

72.0

Becoming involved in programs to clean up the environment

39.4

38.3

33.3

29.3

Developing a meaningful philosophy of life

78.8

83.0

74.1

83.2

Helping to promote racial understanding

84.8

72.3

63.0

64.7

Obtaining recognition from my colleagues for contributions to my special field

42.4

40.4

14.8

35.7

Integrating spirituality into my life

54.5

N/A

70.4

67.9

Being a good colleague

97.0

N/A

92.6

92.4

Being a good teacher

100.0

N/A

54.5

99.0

Most of Earlham faculty’s personal goals are similar to those of all faculty at private colleges. However Earlham faculty remain more interested in helping to promote racial understanding than the national norm. It is surprising, however, that as faculty of a Quaker College they consider integrating spirituality into their lives as less important than all college faculty.

Table 23
Aspects of One’s Job Noted as Very Satisfactory or Satisfactory
 

98 EC
teachers

95 EC
teachers

98 EC
admin

All private colleges

 
%
%
%
%

Salary and fringe benefits

36.4

14.9

42.3

46.5

Opportunity for scholarly pursuits

66.7

46.8

64.7

53.2

Teaching load

54.5

69.6

100.0

52.3

Quality of students

84.8

87.2

90.0

52.5

Working conditions

69.7

76.6

65.4

73.0

Autonomy and independence

93.9

95.7

80.8

88.5

Professional relationships with others

87.9

87.2

80.8

78.0

Social relationships with other faculty

69.7

55.3

65.4

66.7

Competency of colleagues

96.9

89.4

80.8

78.5

Visibility for jobs

63.2

31.0

50.0

43.6

Job security

80.6

70.5

80.8

74.2

Relationships with administration

75.0

31.9

84.0

62.1

Overall job satisfaction

78.8

74.5

88.5

77.8

Opportunity to develop new ideas

81.8

85.1

92.0

77.5


Earlham teaching faculty are more satisfied with opportunities for scholarly pursuits than they were in 1995, however they are somewhat less satisfied with their working conditions.  Although Earlham faculty’s satisfaction with salary and fringe benefits has improved since 1995, they remain less satisfied than all private college faculty.  Teaching faculty relationships with administration at Earlham were more satisfactory than they were in 1995.  All Earlham samples are much more satisfied with the quality of students than are faculty members nation-wide.  Earlham faculty’s overall job satisfaction is very similar to faculty members from all private colleges.

 

Table 24
Sources of Stress

(Percentage of respondents marking “somewhat” OR “extensive”)

SOURCES OF STRESS

98 EC Fac
Male     Fem

95 EC fac
Male     Fem

98 EC adm
Male    Fem

All Private Colleges
Male         Fem

 
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%

Household responsibilities

61.1

100.0

46.7

88.2

83.3

90.9

70.7

82.8

Child care

44.4

40.0

26.7

17.6

41.7

23.1

34.4

32.8

Care of elderly parent

27.8

26.7

23.3

5.9

8.3

21.4

31.6

36.1

My physical health

50.0

53.3

50.0

47.1

8.3

57.1

44.4

52.4

Review/promotion process

16.7

46.7

26.7

70.6

25.0

42.9

40.8

53.5

Subtle discrimination

27.8

13.3

16.7

35.3

16.7

35.7

14.3

33.8

Personal finances

50.0

46.7

36.7

82.4

50.0

57.1

61.7

61.7

Committee work

61.1

53.3

63.3

52.9

25.0

35.7

59.8

67.1

Faculty meetings

66.7

46.7

63.3

64.7

16.7

28.6

50.3

55.4

Colleagues

61.1

60.0

73.3

58.8

33.3

57.1

53.3

60.0

Students

66.7

80.0

63.3

70.6

8.3

50.0

58.0

66.4

Research or publishing demands

22.2

60.0

13.3

35.3

8.3

8.3

43.9

52.6

Inst. Procedures & "red tape"

66.7

46.7

73.3

47.1

25.0

42.9

64.9

64.6

Teaching load

77.8

73.3

56.7

47.1

8.3

0.0

66.9

73.7

Children's problems

33.3

26.7

33.3

11.8

9.1

30.8

32.6

29.7

Marital friction

11.1

33.3

17.2

29.4

36.4

21.4

24.0

22.5

Time pressures

83.3

86.7

93.3

100.0

81.8

78.6

85.6

94.3

Lack of personal life

83.3

93.3

86.2

100.0

90.9

78.6

78.4

91.9

Illness or death of spouse

11.1

0.0

N/A

N/A

0.0

0.0

7.5

6.0

Keeping up with info tech

66.7

53.3

N/A

N/A

81.8

57.1

63.2

74.7


Females reported more stress from household responsibilities than did males.  There was an increase in stress due to childcare for both males and females.  Earlham female faculty reported more stress from a review/promotion process than their male counterparts which may be due to the fact that a greater percentage of females are untenured. Earlham males were less stressed about review/promotion process than faculty from all private colleges.  The same was true about research or publishing demands.

The faculty were asked whether they wished to remain as college professors.  43.6% of the 1998 faculty indicated “definitely yes”, compared to 46.1% nationally.  An additional 36.4% answered “probably yes”, as did 33.8% nation-wide      No Earlham respondents answered “definitely no” in 1995 or 1998, although 1.7% chose this response nationally.

Earlham respondents demonstrate a greater sensitivity toward women and minorities’ issues and are more committed to social service.  Overall, the Earlham faculty is more liberal than the national sample from all private colleges.  Earlham is more focused on fostering students’ personal growth than are other institutions.  This growth includes value, moral, and emotional development, and increased self-understanding. 

While other colleges focus on preparing students to achieve specific educational and professional goals, Earlham strives to prepare students to become better persons, ready for whatever futures they choose.

Prepared by Mary Ann Weaver

January, 2002

Revised April, 2002

 

 

Return to Earlham Home Page
Return to Office of Institutional Research

Created by Mary Ann Weaver
weavema@earlham.edu